Friday, 29 May 2020

Exclusive premiere and interview with indie-folk duo Ben & Slane


Harmonious bonds in music can be a rarity and must be explored to their full potential once found. Ben & Slane, a French duo, certainly think so as they share a path in both career and life. The two are about to release their latest EP, Made Of Gold which features their powerful and sensitive voices. Proudly, we are able to premiere the title track for their EP, along with an exclusive interview with the two unique individuals. Find it all below:

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
We write together, it starts with the guitar, and we put voices to find melodies. Then comes the lyrics and the construction of the song.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
Everything that touches us directly like love, pleasure, life's difficulties and indirectly like the social context, politics, ecology.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Indeed, there is a big difference between the art world and the art business. We think that changing the business world is illusory, change must come first among artists who must have complete freedom over their art and find their audience directly with social networks and by performing on stage as much as possible. As well as have a sufficient fan base and allow them to negotiate their advantages of possible deals with record companies.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
We don't necessarily have preferences, we like both for different reasons. The stage is something strong - it's a direct emotion. While recording in the studio is more introspective, day after day, trying to get there to what we had imagined when the title was only a draft.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
What we are most often told is that our voices work well together, and we feel in our music that something binds us. The most memorable is also when people tell us that despite the darkness of our songs, it does them good.

What's on your current playlist?
Tool, Andrew Bird, Joan Shelley, Joan as a police woman, White Denim, Piers Faccini
Radiohead, Nickel Creek, Pearl Jam, NIN, The Beatles....

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
We will first release our first EP in digital  in early June, and a  physical release later .We should be making a video of our first single this summer and of course start a tour if the health context changes. 

Famous last words?
“Life without music is simply a mistake, a fatigue, an exile”
F. Nietzsche



Follow Ben & Slane
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Monday, 25 May 2020

Interview with singer/songwriter Peach Luffe


Singer/songwriter Peach Luffe arose from a decision Jong had to make: keep pursuing his passion for songwriting in the West or go back to Korea after college. Music has always been his love. So, he went to Canada.

Peach Luffe draws influence from both popular and underground music like guitar playing from John Mayer and Mac Demarco, singing from Allen Stone and recent R&B, as well as melodies from early Coldplay.



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
I was brought up in a classical music household. My mother played the piano for us when we were young. Then I heard "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" by Green Day and it changed my life! I started listening to pop music at that time which were rock bands like My Chemical Romance, Linkin Park and Green Day. Hearing electric guitars from Linkin Park, I knew I had to learn electric guitar!

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
My process is pretty streamlined as far as I know. I'll come with chords and melody, then demo it. I don't just sit down for the purpose of writing. Whenever I force ideas it never works well for me. Ideas will come to me randomly and I'll drop everything I'm doing at that time to do work on the song. Then I'll add other instruments such as bass, drums, and midi instruments to see what fits. Then I'll mix it then send to Michael Friedman our drummer and he'll mix it further and master it.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
It comes randomly. However, I have to get into a headspace. But often inspiration comes from daily issues or my observations of what's going around me.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
There is a big difference, yes. In my experience, I spend far too much time on the other aspects such as social media and it takes away from the actual music-making. It would be nice to have a manager or someone doing this for me but it's not the right time yet. We need to keep building until we absolutely need help. However, it's necessary we do a lot of the music business ourselves because we need to build relationships and learn on our own. We can't depend on someone to do it for us. To be honest I'm not sure what I would change. Maybe for live gigs, people don't assume music is the background music(unless it's jazz dinner music) and give the artists their attention.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
Everything! Everything is fun and rewarding for me. The thing I dislike the most is vocal recording. It's so hard and stressful for me.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
When people say they needed to hear this. Or they say it inspired them. Ah, it's such a rewarding feeling.

What's on your current playlist?
Feng Suave, Big Thief, Billy Joel at the moment.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
2 EPs in 2020! That was my goal and I'm halfway done with the 2nd one!

Famous last words?
I miss going to aquariums


Follow Peach Luffe online 
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Monday, 18 May 2020

Getting to know Swedish indie-rockers Oxen

 Image Credit: Fredrik Stål       


Swedish band Oxen is the unique collaboration between life-long friends Erik and Stefan. They have just released their peculiarly original single with angsty 90’s rock guitar flow called ‘Dark and Depressive’. If you are a fan of The Smashing Pumpkins, Fat White Family, or The Cure, this band would be right up your alley. Their previous hit ‘Matrix Moves’ ranked #1 on German College Radio Charts for several weeks and to top it all off, they currently sit close to 1 million streams to date!

We find out more about the promising duo below.

Which experiences inspired your new single ‘Dark and Depressive’?

Been listening to a lot of 80s/90s stuff when writing this album and kinda wanted to catch that vibe. Remember writing this intro, wanted it to sound like something you could have written in high school, I like the simplicity of it.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Usually, first, there's an idea that is entirely free from limitations. That's where we normally fall for a specific part of the song. Then we have to lay some sort of a puzzle to make sense of things. But in some cases, we skip the puzzle part, because the song kind of writes itself.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

There's this example we keep coming back to, and it's when we listen to a perfect song. Like ”Dreams” by Fleetwood Mac. I think reading into the formula and structure of it really gets our creativity going. Or just simply cool things, like the intro of ‘Deal Wiv It’ by Mura Masa and slowthai.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

Not so fond of the whole business and marketing part. Of course, we're looking forward to showing people our new songs and stuff, but sometimes the process with a release also kills our own "vibe" for the song, but on the other hand, it's also what makes us wanna write new ones.

About the music scene, there's obviously a ton of changes that could be made. The most urgent one should be making it equal. Also quite tired of the shutting down of smaller clubs to build some expensive apartment complex.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Definitely the live bit, but I don't think the one could work without the other really. Or wait. I don't know. Sometimes the thrill of creating, beats everything. I'm conflicted.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

At a gig during one of our Germany tours, there was this guy who showed up several nights in a row. Even if we travelled like really far in between the gigs, he'd be there the next day. I remember it so well because he didn't reach out to us after the shows or anything, he just wanted to listen.

What's on your current playlist?

Talking Heads, Khruangbin, Cate Le Bon

You have mentioned in past statements that you have prepared a few tracks in the hopes to form a cohesive future album. Why did you choose ‘Dark and Depressive’ as your first release of 2020?  

Maybe it's not representative for the whole album, but it sure catches the 90s vibe that we had in mind while working in the studio.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

This single will be followed by a music video, it's a 10$ production but with a really advanced choreography, looking forward to releasing that one. Then there will be more singles and eventually an album.

Famous last words?

Don't buy a cat. Buy a dog.




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Thursday, 14 May 2020

Interview with rock band GUILTY



Rock band GUILTY’s first 2020 single was “Walking on in hope” They plan to have a consecutive series of singles released in 2020. Guilty defines its music style as Alternative Rock with a radio-friendly flair.

They have blended the best of two continents, mixing the South American and European heritage with their lifelong love of rock music to create catchy songs that would leave the listener moved by the raw emotion.


What are some of your earliest memories of music?

Our memories are varied coming from different countries, we were exposed to our local music genres. However, we share a passion for Rock music.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Ruben would create the melody and lyrics, then we all arrange the songs. (Renan & Cristi)

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

Definitely live performances are priceless, however, the whole process or creating and producing a song is exciting,

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Having a friend and family liking and singing our songs together during a live show.

If you could put together a radio show, what kind of music would you play?

Definitely rock and traditional music from our own countries.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

immediate goals are for us to keep growing our fan base and keep releasing good songs.

One last thought to leave your fans with?

Keep us on our radar!

Follow GUILTY online 
Facebook | Instagram | Website | Soundcloud
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Monday, 11 May 2020

Band Saint Mars collaborate with Jethro “Alonestar” Sheeran

Image: Nick Fancher
Saint Mars transfer a message of hope in their new song ‘Pacific State’ featuring Ed Sheeran’s cousin and rapper Jethro “Alonestar” Sheeran. The group consists of singer Tryzdin, manager Marc Darcange and group founder Angelo Bruschini (Massive Attack guitarist). They have been viewed over 1.2 million times on streaming platforms. 15-year-old lead singer Tryzdin, has gained fame from his impressive vocal range in his cover of singer Adele’s song titled  ‘Hello’. The video sits on 3.7 million views!

Saint Mars talks about the single, “With “Pacific State”, we wanted to fuse pop and trip-hop with obsessive tribal beats and draw a line between Massive Attack, Empire of the Sun and Tears for Fears. The song takes you back to the glorious magic of the 80’s… “Pacific State” delivers a message of hope, carried by the ongoing faith in a better world after a tragic fall, and the necessary perseverance in adversity.”

Relish Rock  adds, “Saint Mars sounds does results in close comparison to the work of Massive Attack, Chainsmokers, and Empire of the Sun. ‘Pacific State’ creates an empowering and hopeful single lyrically with "Pacific State, I want to believe, never give it away. Pacific state, pacific state, for you and me, we'll be keeping our faith”.

Saint Mars create magic in their new song ‘Pacific State’ by throwing genre normalities out of the window, and creating a quirky and harmonious flow in their new song.



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Friday, 8 May 2020

Emerging Manchester band crush release new song ‘All My Plants Are Dead’



Emerging Manchester band crush craft a refreshing heart on its sleeve shoegaze sound that’s peppered with nods to 80s alt-pop and jazz-inspired indie. They release their latest single ‘All My Plants Are Dead’ on the 1st of May 2020, listen to it below. It’s the sister track to their August 2019 release ‘Glue’, a track dubbed “grunge-pop at its best” (BBC Introducing). Drawing comparisons to Diiv, The Cure and Alvvays, crush look set to carve out their own ambient noise void into the UKs underground music scene.

‘All My Plants Are Dead’ is a bittersweet yet discordant offering, where the addictive and wistful vocals of Amber Warren blend with the jangle of Arthur Boyd’s carefree cartwheeling guitars. The enveloping verses are woven with floating vocals infused with a message of empathy and understanding and supple percussion. Punctuated by the tight and punching chorus’:  an interlude section inspired by William S.Burroughs ‘Naked Lunch’ is followed by a cathartic noise outro that reimagines the sweet musical introduction to the song, bringing it full circle. Bright, airy and beguiling, it’s a highly promising new chapter for crush, you are sure to fall head over heels for.



Follow crush online 
Facebook | YouTube | Soundcloud
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Wednesday, 6 May 2020

INTERVIEW WITH SOUTHERN PORTUGAL-BASED MUSIC COLLECTIVE MIRA PARDELHA



Southern Portugal-based collective, Mira Pardelha started with drummer, Jason Breckenridge,  living in Lisbon with his friend Ian Brimacombe, a guitarist and songwriter. The pair had played in bands in their home town of Montreal and had both fallen in love with their adopted city. Two decades later, they turned years of discussion into a set of song structures that articulated their feelings and memories from that time.



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?  

We're a collective of people who have always been around music. Some of us have played in other bands. Half of us live in London via Toronto and Montreal. Half of us live in Lisbon. Tiago runs a studio in the Portuguese capital. This project is our attempt to draw out a longstanding love of great Luso music - fado legends like Amalia Rodrigues and Brazilian giants like Gal Costa and Milton Nascimento with our love of great Anglo-American underground music, from the Ronettes to Scott Walker and more recent legends like PJ Harvey. We're all friends but our physical and cultural differences mean we all come at the music with varying approaches and contexts and our debut album 'About Land' is a fusion of some kind of resulting Anglo-Portuguese aesthetic.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

Mira Pardelha's debut, About Land, took shape over many years, with a shifting number of musicians. Jason and Ian played in bands in their home town of Montreal and moved to Lisbon. Later they moved to London and put the project together with new friends, Ursula (from Toronto) and Portuguese friends - Benedita, Tiago and Nuno. The two Canadians brought their structures and melodies to Tiago, who helped to arrange the tracks and brought in string and horn players. Jason wrote briefs for Nuno, who crafted the ideas into lyrics. Then Benedita and Ursula brought their own style and energy to each track.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

We're motivated by finding old Brazilian records and studying the production on them - and by just being in so many areas of Lisbon at night. We're constantly trying to turn the mystery of Lisbon squares and streets into song ideas - and somehow capturing that feeling.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

We don't ever think about the business side of music -  we have always made music for ourselves and if people like it, that's good enough. We'd encourage everyone in the business to channel a DIY spirit. Just find what you want to say and work hard to say it as best you can.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

There is nothing like the thrill of performing live but Mira Pardelha has so far been a studio-based project. We wanted to channel the production of some of the albums and artists we love. But we hope to keep evolving.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

We've had some record labels say how much they love the sound.

What's on your current playlist?

We're always mining old Brazilian records for inspiration - Lo Borges, Chico Buarque, Gal Costa  - and a more recent beautiful record by Priscilla Ermel called Origens Da Luz.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We're making videos, writing and enjoying the process. The challenge is always keeping a large collective in two cities engaged,  but that makes the results more interesting.

Famous last words?

Obrigada!


Follow Mira Pardelha online 
YouTube | Bandcamp | Spotify | Facebook | Twitter
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Monday, 4 May 2020

Alt-rock soloist Drew Davies shares bold song ‘X and Y’


Alt-rock soloist Drew Davies has released his latest single ‘X and Y’ via AD1. The track features on his upcoming self-titled album(15 May 2020). The album boasts credits of mastering by John Webber (David Bowie, Super Furry Animals and mixer Steve Honest (Oasis, Eurythmics). Davies previous release is his video for song ‘Mrs Taylor’, about his childhood friend’s mother who passed. Music blog Relish Rock  shares their thoughts on the video .“Shows clips of the village where Drew grew up and has a  hazy retro-feel.”

Speaking of the single, Drew Davies tells us, "I wrote ‘X and Y’ on women's day a few years ago. It's a song that on one hand calls for equality for all people, no matter their age, sex or orientation; whilst on the other hand calling out hypocrisy stemming from the kinds of people who say one thing publicly and another behind closed doors. It was originally written on piano but for the single and album we decided to add a pseudo-Tarantino vibe with vintage guitars and synthesizers."

Davies creates retro rock nostalgia in his soundscape on ‘X and Y’, but his message is of modern thinking about gender norms that constrict us from being our true selves.



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Interview with Indie-folk singer Cormac Russell



Canadian born Indie-folk singer Cormac Russell has taken his music across the globe, including England and China. He released his second album titled “Nately's Whore” in September of last year. Playing all the instruments himself, he draws from a diverse range of influences; from contemporaries like Mac DeMarco and Nick Cave to literary giants like Walt Whitman.

Cormac Russell has just announced a brand new song ‘Yankee Fool’ which was released on the 1st of May.



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

My earliest memory of being really enchanted by music would probably be hearing Elton John's Greatest Hits, which we had in my folk's house in Canada. I started playing piano when I was about six, but I only started to write songs when I hit my teens in Ireland; around the time I first started to learn guitar. I got really into Radiohead when I was fifteen, and that sort of opened up the whole world of guitar music for me.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I'll usually be sitting on my couch, just idly fingering notes and singing gibberish. It's very much an instinctive process; if I'm inspired by an idea, I'll get out my phone and record it. I'll listen back eventually, and if I like what I hear, I'll record the idea on my Mac, and write some lyrics. Occasionally a song will just fall out of my head, with all the words and melodies intact - but this is rare.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Listening to music is a good way of finding inspiration, as is reading and meeting people. Just getting out and experiencing life is important, as it all somehow comes out in the songs.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

I think the music industry is more democratic nowadays. Artists probably have more power and audiences seem to decide who will be the next big thing, rather than record labels. I'd personally like to see musicians taking more risks though and not trying to fit into a particular genre. The thing that most turns me off is when I see an artist merely trying to please people with their songs, rather than making any kind of authentic statement. However, these kinds of musicians tend to dominate the charts these days - a lot of them seem to try to be like Ed Sheeran. I feel like it must be disappointing to the people who grew up listening to Dylan, Sonic Youth or Nirvana. There's obviously less money in music these days so perhaps there's more incentive for musicians to pander to the masses. Perhaps it's best if songwriters have a day job, and focus on improving their craft - if only we had a universal basic income! A lot of my musician friends are on social welfare and I think that shouldn't be stigmatised.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

It really depends on the day. I get a great buzz out of writing what I think is a decent lyric or song, but I also really enjoy performing - especially if the audience is responsive.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

I launched my second album at the Workman's Club in Dublin, and I was pleasantly surprised at the level of response. By the end of my set, the room was full and had an electric atmosphere.

What's on your current playlist?

I just created a quarantine playlist, which has some amazing local Irish artists like Kieran Mulvihill, Tracy Gallagher and Daithi Shanahan. Check them out! Recently I've been getting really into Louden Wainwright and Ben Kweller. Kurt Vile, Father John Misty and Conor Oberst are also some of my biggest influences.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

I'm releasing my follow up single, ‘Yankee Fool’, on May 1st, and my third album titled “Regicide” on May 22nd.

Famous last words?

Stay home and wash your hands!

Follow Cormac Russell online 
Soundcloud | Bandcamp | Instagram | Facebook
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Premiere: Music producer PYX announced a new song ‘Is This What You Want?’



PYX is the creation of Kent-based multi-instrumentalist Wesley Triffitt has just announced a brand new song ‘Is This What You Want?’ which is set to be released on the 10th of April 2020.

Having exploded onto the scene in 2019 with infectious track ‘Play On’, followed by lyrical masterpiece ‘The Movies’, his latest single ‘ Is This Is What You Want’ showcases Wesley’s natural songwriting talent and natural instinct for production.



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Premiere: Music producer Mechner announces a new song ‘Do You Wanna Go?’



Cork-based artist Mechner has just announced a brand new song which is set to be released on the 30th of April 2020.

"Do You Wanna Go?" is a self-recorded single about the "animalistic side" and "ritualisation" of modern music and clubbing scene: the herd mentality, if you will. The sickly beats that pummel your eardrums to near deafness, the sticky overcrowded venues and the sad emptiness of the hedonistic dance we all perform together.



Follow Mechner online 
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Interview with rock band Children of the State



Children of the State present a blend of smooth and anthemic vintage rock which is equidistant between the glam rock of the 70s and sunny nostalgia of the 60s, with a bit of electronica added in for good measure.

They seem more concerned with infiltrating the mind through a series of decadent, well-informed morsels that bury in the brain before you realise what’s happening.

See our exclusive interview with them below:



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

John: Bob Dylan for me, my dad brought me up on a steady diet of Sabbath, Dylan, Beatles and Oasis. I remember seeing a video of Dylan during the rolling thunder tour and wanting to be that guy, that enigma.

Nathan: Funnily enough my first memory of really appreciating something musical was listening to mad punk music I'd found on the internet and trying to replicate that on a cheap bass guitar I got for Christmas one year. Sex Pistols, Stiff Little Fingers, NOFX etc. Really fuelled a lot of teenage angst for me.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

John: I and Nathan usually get together with lyrics/melodies and after they've evolved into something that resembles a song we take it to the others and they add their interpretations and ideas, that's how we've worked from day one and it's been a painless and productive process. A lot of our tracks are quite different sonically but we like that, I don't think a band should ever be limited to one sound, all the greats have constantly evolved.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

John: Working into the small hours.

Nathan: Discipline.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

Nathan: It's definitely got its flaws but I think business as a whole is pretty damn corrupt. If I were to change one thing about the music scene it would be the amount of funding that is injected into it by the government. Especially in times like these where we're all stuck inside it's become increasingly apparent just how important the arts are to our sanity and wellbeing - yet they're horrifically underfunded.

John: It'd also be good to see more mental health support for touring musicians across the industry, there are great causes already doing this, such as YANA Festival but I think we all need to work harder together to help beat the stigma.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

John: I used to prefer playing live but since starting this band I think it's got to be the studio for me.

Nathan: Me too, every time we've been in the studio with this project it's been like training for a boxing match and winning it. During the Gideon's Bible sessions the process got so intense that at one point we summoned a ghost and everybody saw it, even the producer. God knows what happened there but if you listen hard enough to the Gideon's Bible track you can hear the point this happens.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Nathan: Our first gig in London was accidentally at an Irish bar in Croydon to an audience that was expecting easy-listening pop covers on a Saturday night. We were anxious about meeting the set length requirement imposed by the venue (2 hours) so ripped into a psych-prog interlude for about 20 mins to make up the time, and we inevitably got cut off. The sound man ran to the stage in disgust and said: “Who do you think you are, The Velvet f***** Underground?! F*** off back to Sheffield.” And that was our first trip to the big smoke.

Corey: Yeah, that was a weird evening.

What's on your current playlist?

John: Weyes Blood, Gram Parson, Lee Hazlewood, Brittany Howard. We've compiled one here for people to listen to https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1sEefYuMfI6qM0IgqI8sX6?si=PA6uTRyJRieLpGxHi_dc0w

Nathan: Don't forget Glen Campbell and Julia Bardo.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

Nathan: Our next single Big Sur out on the 10th of April! We're really excited about getting this one out there.

Famous last words?

John: Listen to fools, the mob rules

Nathan: I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.


Follow Children of the State online 
YouTube | Twitter | Instagram | Facebook
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Interview with Swedish singer-songwriter Timothy



Swedish singer-songwriter Timothy provides his own musical touch to the world of songwriters, delivering a taste of indie-folk, electronica and a hint of neo-classical elements.

He started his career in 2017 releasing his debut single “Dust”. Gaining attention on YouTube channel Apeiron, he has since been working heavily on perfecting his craft. Now going live with his new single “Alone”, the follow up to the recent release “Home”.

See our exclusive interview with him below:



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

One of my earliest memories was when I got a hold of my stepfather’s guitar (I think I might have been 5 or 6 years old). We had been listening to this Swedish band called Sideshow Bob. They had a song with a siren type note which really caught my ear. I wanted to recreate the noise with the guitar, but I was as you can imagine - left without any good results.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I usually start with a rough sketch, an idea behind my work. Sometimes something lyrical or it could be a pattern on the guitar or piano. From that I work my way through the song, my favourite part is getting lost in ambience, creating floaty sounds that you might not even realise is there.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

If I had the answer I would probably be throwing songs out there.

There are so many different things that have influenced my writing. Lately, I have caught myself influenced by my time in nature, my hikes and all the quietness around me. The sound of silence might be a way to put it.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

I wish there was a place and time for everyone.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

There is definitely a completely unique charm within both. I do love getting lost in my own studio bubble. To be sat for hours creating weird noises and letting yourself fail for infinite times is something completely fantastic, it’s like exploring your inner child all over again.

I have huge stage fright, yet I still love performing. Standing on stage with full focus on your craft is something magical, and nothing that can ever match up to. Unfortunately, there is not much of it right now. I can tell you that I am longing for it...

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

I played as a support act in my hometown where the audience was narrowed down and shy. There was just one person right in front of the stage, everyone else was stood in the corner. It was a lady who decided to sit down, just right in front of the stage. Her eyes were stuck to the ground, whilst her face was slowly waving along to the music.

Right there time stood still.

What's on your current playlist?

Agnes Obel’s new album “Myopia” is gorgeous. ❤

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

As for most of us, COVID-19 has put me in a quite tricky position. I have travelled back to Sweden from England to be closer to my family & my friends. Sadly, my musical instruments got stuck behind me... Quarantined in its own space.

I guess for me it’s not all bad news though. You can surely expect some live streams coming up and hopefully, I will get the debut EP out there for all of us to listen to in 2020.

Famous last words?

“Happiness Only Real When Shared”


Follow Timothy online 

Instagram | Facebook | Spotify | Soundcloud
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Interview with rock band Cab Ellis



Los Angeles-based rock band Cab Ellis consist of Connor Abeles (Vocals/Keys), Matt Richards (Sax/Clarinet/Flute), Nick Petrou (Bass), Luke Woodle (Drums) and Jonny Sim (Guitar). The sound combines the power and spirit of rock & roll with the lyricism of hip-hop and contains elements of jazz and gospel music.

Since their inception, Cab Ellis has performed at venues such as The Troubadour, The Lodge Room and Whisky A Go-Go. They were selected to be a part of NPR's Tiny Desk Contest On The Road in 2019 and have opened for fellow hip-hop artist, Watsky.

See our exclusive interview with them below:


Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

LUKE: For me, it was the radio and the music my parents played. When you’re a kid you connect to music in a different way that’s completely by gut-feeling. The first time I heard Led Zeppelin it rocked my world. If that wasn’t enough, watching my dad play all the drum fills to each song was the catalyst into my appreciation for music. I also had older cousins that all played in jazz bands, so by the time I was ready to play the drums I was being given albums that were 25 - 50 years older than me. I was probably the only 7th grader that had the same taste in music as my friend’s grandparents.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

NICK: With Nighttime OCD Connor came in with the songs written and the story for the album clearly mapped. He had a loose idea what he would play on piano but everything else was left purposefully open for us to create and arrange the songs as a band. The goal was to make an album greater than the sum of its parts and in order to do that we spent many late nights in a rehearsal studio learning about each other’s playing styles and tactfully weaving our energy into each song. Those nights always ended in pure joy. I’d say the only specific steps are that we arrange together and that every beat is up for discussion.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

CONNOR: I think just newness in general. Being in a new environment, meeting a new person, or having your routine rattled in some way. For all of us, we’re going through changes all the time, good and bad. You have to live through all of that on your own, but with a band, you get to play through it too, through all the unfamiliarity and try to hash it out that way. I think we’re all our best when there’s a need behind what we’re doing. I’m proud to be in a band with people who’ve always got something to say. We all draw inspiration from each other. It feels okay to let our hearts bleed freely whenever we play.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

MATT: Not really. The business side of music has always been scrambling, trying to make more money from art. That’s led to innovation- Coachella, Newport Jazz Festival, and other musical events/celebrations. I feel like there’s a lot of young people today, musicians or not, that value music and the connection it can create, live or recorded. Music isn’t going away any time soon and we’re just trying to be a part of it- we kind of have to (haha).

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

LUKE: Love ’em both for different reasons. In the studio, you get to craft the recording exactly the way you want it and each little detail is scrutinized and worked on. When we recorded Nighttime OCD there was no stone left unturned and we were able to solely focus on the performances of the songs. When you perform live you have to completely let go and just play. You have to give yourself up to the music and trust that the work you’ve put in will pay off and let the music tell you what to do. We’ve never played the same show twice and it’s that unique exchange of energy between the band and audience that keeps us addicted to playing live.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

NICK: I remember our gig with Watsky in San Luis Obispo, California. We were the first of three openers. “Nobody” was our first song and it starts with Connor wailing at the top of his lungs accompanied by just a piano and when he started I saw people laughing and preparing to fold their arms for the next 30 minutes. All of that changed after the band came in. We rocked hard and fearlessly and ultimately had the audience dancing, cheering, and wishing our set was longer. That was my first gig with the band and I was stoked.

What's on your current playlist?

CONNOR: Chicago, New Radicals, G. Love and Special Sauce, and always The Velvet Underground.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

CONNOR: Music videos and merch. Little further off, we’ve got two more albums in the works and a movie.

Famous last words?

MATT: Tough.

Follow Cab Ellis online
Website | YouTube | Soundcloud | Spotify | Instagram

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Interview with London-based rocker Georgia Maria



Camden, London-based rocker Georgia Maria has performed at Latitude Festival, Standon Calling Festival and at renowned London venues including the Hope & Anchor, the Fiddler’s Elbow, the Dublin Castle and the Bedford, and has opened for progressive rock band The Room at Jagz Ascot as well as cult folk singer-songwriter Beans On Toast at Pryzm Kingston.

Whilst gigging and writing extensively, she unveiled her debut release, Musketeers, recorded with award-winning producer Dax Liniere - followed on Easter Sunday 2020 with the "hair raising murder ballad", Red-Handed Man.



Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

I got my start in music pretty abruptly: I got a guitar for my 15th birthday, messed around on it for an hour or so, and thought to myself; "Well, looks like this is it for you from now on - you found it!". I was onstage with a band playing my first (terrible!) guitar solo within a couple of months, and promptly started telling all the school careers advisors that I planned to be a rockstar. I'm not sure I've grown up since :-)

My earliest influences were all the '70s and '80s punk bands, which is where my fast-strumming approach came from as I would try to mimic the drum fills on those records; a little later my tastes naturally branched out in all directions, so within my original music nowadays there's all sorts in the mix in terms of influences: everything from PJ Harvey to Leonard Cohen to Tool! Sounds like an unlikely combination on paper... but I think you'll hear it.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

My songwriting process is super unconventional, mostly owing to me being a bit of a nerd! I know that the way I write differs quite a lot from the way that my musician friends write their songs. For one, everything comes from the lyric in my writing process rather than the other way around; I'll write a full plot around a character or theme and make sure everything about the lyric is as I want it, before I even start to compose the music for it. I'm very analytical in the way I approach creativity, and I like to have full control over how I communicate my ideas, so I never cowrite or just "jam out" a song - it's all very methodical and painstakingly put together, note-by-note at times. Musically, I'll always try to set each of my songs apart from one another by putting unusual combinations of meter, tempo and mode together, such as writing a melody in harmonic minor over an uptempo 6/8 backing, for instance. I'm a sucker for key changes and edgy notes in unexpected places!

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Keeping the wheels turning regularly. I'm always at risk of being dictated to by my moods, in terms of when I will and won't create, but it's something I'm gradually getting a handle on. If you write regularly as a natural habit, there isn't any ice there to break and it comes easily.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

Nobody knows what they're doing! At least when it comes to advancing an artist's career. No industry is without self-styled "experts" of course, but in the music business it really does seem like everybody's shooting in the dark. The only thing those in the business arm of the music industry seem to agree on is that we artists are all naïve and easily exploitable. I'd like to see more value placed on integrity among those with power over their artists' futures - it's not nice to see the talented, deserving people around you growing jaded and cynical the longer they spend in the music scene.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?

All different sides of the same (apparently three-sided?) coin - fortunately I very much enjoy all of them! I would say though that playing live was my first love and it's something I can never get enough of. I played 172 gigs last year, partly to combat performance anxiety and partly to get my songs in front of as many new faces as possible... but deep down it was really performing for the sake of performing, and for the thrill of it. It's the gift that keeps on giving as no two nights are ever the same.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

"I want to have your babies!" - one excited gentleman in the audience at Standon Calling Festival 2016.

What's on your current playlist?

My current repeat offenders include Elliott Smith, Halestorm, Nothing More, Larkin Poe... and Skindred! I don't think my Skindred craze will ever end. It's glorious.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

We're all in lockdown at the time of writing, so the future's uncertain but I do know for sure that I'll be shooting some home videos and getting my old YouTube channel up and running again. I used to record covers of guitar solos as a teenager and it seemed to give people a lot of enjoyment (there were some interesting/questionable moves floating around back then...), so it seems like a fitting time to do likewise now that most of us have time on our hands. After that, I'll be releasing the remaining three songs of my debut EP in succession as singles, then once we're able to get together again I'll celebrate with a big EP launch party.

Famous last words?

Nothing fame-worthy comes to mind but feel free to take a listen to my new singles, Musketeers and Red-Handed Man. The latter was released recently on Easter Sunday - it's a murder ballad with guitar solos. Hopefully you're already sold and I need say no more :-)

Follow Georgia Maria online 
Soundcloud | Facebook | YouTube | Spotify | Instagram 

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