Friday, 3 July 2020

Exclusive Premiere and Interview with Moondays as they share new song, ‘Andy’s Room’



Born of the encounter between actor and singer-songwriter Yohan Levy, keyboardist and film music composer Louis Machto, and arranger and guitarist Luc Montaudon, Moondays seek to build bridges between cinematic story-telling and acoustic pop music.

Navigating between pop, folk and alternative rock, Moondays tell us the stories of imaginary characters, though anchored in reality, through sinuous melodies and floating harmonies, punctuated with sounds of everyday life. Borrowing as much from the codes of English rock opera as from sound fiction, Moondays tackles the brutality of contemporary themes through daydreaming and poetry.Their self-produced debut studio album, The Last Sunday of Andy Glane, follows the steps and thoughts of a young idealistic misfit on his last day in town.

It is in the sometimes dark heart of their world city - Paris - that the three musicians of Moondays imagined the romantic and solitary wanderings of a certain Andy Glane, the anti-hero of their very cinematographic first studio album. “The Last Sunday of Andy Glane”, or a whole day in the life of this young guy who is a bit lost, a symbol (perhaps) of a generation Y in search of new landmarks. Hour by hour, fear by fear, we will follow the lonely man throughout the record, throughout the city, from his room to the café, from the café to the subway.

From July 5 to August 16, the album will unfold single by single, place by place. Then, it will be time to walk in Andy's footsteps for a whole day, a whole adventure. The complete album, “The Last Sunday of Andy Glane”, will be available on all platforms on Sunday, August 23, 2020.

Ahead of the official release this Sunday, we present the premiere of ‘Andy’s Room’ for you to enjoy.




Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
Each of us has had the chance to grow up in a musical climate. From a young age, Yohan used to listen to his father’s vinyls of David Bowie and the Beatles, Louis would go to concerts in his dad’s theatre and Luc would attend his accordionist mother and guitar player father's shows. Then, the three of us had musical attempts with different bands of different styles - hip-hop for Louis, pop-folk for Yohan and rock for Luc - before forming Moondays.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
Usually, Louis and Luc come up with chords, which inspire Yohan with words and melodies. Or the opposite, Yohan imagines a melody with basic harmonies that Louis and Luc then enrich. For The "Last Sunday of Andy Glane", the concept of telling a story that unfolds song after song was also both an artistic constraint and precious guidance in the writing of the songs, musically and lyrically.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
Our differences, in terms of both musical tastes and artistic background. Louis loves rap music and studied at the Paris Conservatory like Luc, who enjoys everything that grooves, whereas Yohan is more of a self-taught musician keen of sinuous melodies. Those differences combined with a shared love for rich harmonies and cinematic story-telling - Louis also composes film music, Yohan is an actor and Luc has contributed to a few soundtracks - are at the origin of this concept-album, which borrows as much from the codes of English rock opera as from sound fiction.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Playlisting has taken a huge importance in the music world. Obviously, that’s a great way to discover new artists and to listen to songs that match your very mood of the moment. But, at the same time, catchy singles do not shed light on the less accessible tracks of a record any more, and albums as are less and less considered as coherent wholes than as sets of tracks that can easily be deconstructed. By connecting the songs of "TLSOAG" by both a story and sounds of everyday life, we somehow encourage people to listen to the album at one go.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
From the start, we have thought "TLSOAG" as both a studio concept album and an immersive live show. In fact, the studio work has allowed us to create the sound identity of the album and precise the cinematic atmosphere that blends music with sounds first. Then, even though the Covid crises made us opt for a digital release, we have plenty of ideas to turn the album into an theatrical live show - somewhere between a concert and a musical - and we can't wait for the concert halls to reopen.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
We received feedback from very diverse professionals on different aspects of the project, which have all touched us a lot. Pop-folk artist Cocoon and Director of label Matthieu Gazier highlighted the composition and production. As for film music composer Marie-Jeanne Serrero and music journalist Emmanuel Tellier, they were both very sensitive to the fresh and nostalgic cinematic escape.

What's on your current playlist?
Eels, Rufus Wainright, Sean Lennon, Arcade Fire, The Velvet Underground...

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
Every Sunday of the summer, we'll unveil a new piece of "The Last Sunday of Andy Glane". From July 5 to August 16, the album will unfold single by single, place by place. Then, it will be time to walk in Andy's footsteps for a whole day, a whole adventure with the release of the complete album and, hopefully, live shows for the audience to physically immerse themselves in Andy's world.

Famous last words?
Be kind with Andy. He's very sensitive but we're sure you guys can get along. And please introduce him to your friends, he doesn't have many.

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Tuesday, 30 June 2020

Q&A with Omar Addis



Last week we had the pleasure of premiering the smooth new single, ‘Easy’, from burgeoning talent, Omar Addis. ‘Easy’ was released on the 29th of June and is a great way to ease into the second half of this very difficult year.




We shared some questions with the young artist to get to know him better.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
I grew up around really good music thanks to my parents, with Aretha Franklin, Led Zeppelin and Bill Withers to name a few artists, but the first time I distinctly remember getting into music was when I heard 'I am the Walrus' by the Beatles, and I just knew that I wanted to make music as good as that. I've been playing guitar for about 12 years, and producing for around 8 as a result of being a music fan since then.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
There's no real formula to it, I'll just get an idea, whether it's a lyric or guitar riff or drum beat and record it, then I come back to it later and see if I can expand on it. I don't like sticking to a process, because whenever I have done the music can be a bit more derivative, so I'll usually try to start from a different place and build on it organically.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
Listening to new music tends to inspire me, hearing a sound that I've never heard before makes me want to try and produce something similar in my own style, even if it's just for practice and no-one will ever hear it.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
While as a fan I love streaming platforms like Spotify or Apple music which let me hear loads of music that I may not have heard otherwise, they have definitely contributed to the shortening of attention spans for music, with the algorithms generally favouring a shorter length pop song than a longer experimental piece. Pay per play also favours the shorter song, so there is less incentive to be more creative with songwriting for artists right now.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
Both are hugely rewarding parts of music. I love the perfection and creativity of the studio, but I think I slightly prefer performing music, seeing the listener interact with your creation in real time is really fulfilling.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
When I was 16 I used to be in a band called Killin' Time, and we played a gig in a warehouse with another local band. The audience were people from different schools in the area and the reaction to our original songs was just amazing, people were dancing and having a good time.

What's on your current playlist?
There's so much music that I love right now I couldn't mention it all, but some of the new records that I'm listening to are from Tame Impala, Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, King Krule, and Freddie Gibbs

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
I have a lot of music that's almost ready, and I think I will be able to finish some of those songs up this summer and release a new EP this year hopefully.


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Friday, 26 June 2020

Exclusive Premiere of Omar Addis' cool and colourful new song, ‘Easy’



Young Omar Addis has already invested over 10 years into his passion for music, collaborating with artists such as Julian Lamadrid and Heavy Pulse along the way. He has released 2 singles and one EP since 2018 as a solo artist. We are excited to premiere his latest single, ‘Easy’, a fusion of indie with electronic beats, and a hint of psychedelia.

Opening with washed-out guitar, Omar’s primary instrument, ‘Easy’ soon falls into a thick groove reminiscent of early Tame Impala material. The song is well structured and Omar’s vocals are understated amidst the vibrant electronic instrumentation and effects enveloping the listener. The 21-year-old’s latest offering is brimming with effortless cool and exhibits growing confidence in his ability as a songwriter, performer and producer.

‘Easy’ is out on June 29, 2020.






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Tuesday, 23 June 2020

Q&A with Matt Ryan ahead of his debut single release, ‘You Can Do Anything’, on Friday 26 June.




The cheeky & charming Londoner, Matt Ryan, is set to release his debut single, 'You Can Do Anything', on June 26th, 2020. Matt left behind a successful sales career to follow his dream of writing and performing as an artist. ‘You Can Do Anything’ reveals the thoughts and feelings that arose from this leap of faith, the decision not coming without an awareness of the risk in this extreme change of lifestyle, as Matt references in the second verse:

''Just a memory that has faded for good, I do what I want rather than what I should."

It is about having the courage to take gambles in life when the time arises; steering you towards your passion.

Having already gained support with Vibe Radio & BBC Radio Nottingham spinning the single prior to release, the risk seems to be paying off. The 24 year old became obsessed with the idea of bringing people together through music in his teens, and recalls his first concert as being the moment his passion began. Matt is determined to impact his listeners in the same way:

‘‘My goal is to make people feel how I felt after seeing my first concert; the complete euphoria and elation that stays with you.’’

Get to know this exciting young artist below:

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

I used to love all the early 2000's pop like Scouting for Girls, Take That, Maroon 5 and Busted as a kid which is why I started bashing them out on the piano and trying to write my own music. I loved the big band sound I could hear from songs like that. Any opportunity I had to hear that type of thing whether it was a live gig or a musical theatre show, I was just really blown away by the musicians and how it all came together. 

What are some of your key musical influences?

I grew up listening to all the greats like Elton John and Billy Joel and Madness but then I built my own interest in pop/rock bands like U2, Coldplay, and Ryan Tedder of One Republic. I have taken great influence from DJ's like Martin Garrix, Tiesto and Avicii as well. This has really helped me shape songs with more dramatic effect and power.

If you could paint a picture of your unique sound, what would it look like?

I always like my songs to be punchy and interesting from the get go. I tend to always start on the piano using elegant chord progressions as a template, and then later adding powerfully building synths and guitar parts to compliment it all. I like to think it has a lot of colour, but also quite simplistic. I like the sound to reflect the different moods and emotions we all go through in life. 

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?

I like to start with the music first. Most of the time I'll just be jamming on the piano by myself or with my guitarist, trying to mesh together ideas. Melodies that don't get used still continue to float around in my head, even for years in some cases, and can end up slotting perfectly into place with something fresh later on, which is great. Once I've got a good gage on whether it's strong and if I believe in it, I'll start to focus on a subject matter and lyrics that match the feel of the music and come up with some vocals.

What gets your creative juices flowing?

Being completely relaxed, taking inspiration from an experience I've had or something that's been on my mind, and then finding the right moment to sit down and translate this through music. It's not always possible, but trying not to be pressured by a time limit helps. In my experience, the best moments have come from a moment of carelessness or lack of attention, where I've drifted off and then caught myself actually thinking up something exciting.

As an artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

We live in a time where it's so easy to access new music, which is great, but we also see music that's designed to make a quick impression on our decreasing attention spans. It circulates so fast and gains mass exposure but the songs can be forgotten about as quickly as they surface. 

You used to buy an album, listen to the whole thing and really invest in it, and so I hope my music can have a lasting impression and stay with people for a long time.

Tell us about the chemistry you have with your fans on stage.

I enjoy bringing people together with sing along moments throughout the show. I like to be completely myself and aim for this to shine through in the best way possible. I always bear in mind these moments when writing new music, as I think its a key element of a live show.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?

Recently I did a few intimate gigs to test out new material and the response was really motivating. Lots of people I'd never met were praising my passion when performing and were keen to find out where they could find my music.

Musicians are encouraged to promote themselves and I'd been working on this, but this time the music was speaking for itself and I could sense the crowd connecting with it and the excitement growing. This is all you really hope for as for as an emerging artist. 

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

The dream is to be able to do this for a living; to share my music as an artist alongside writing for other singers too. Success is putting on unforgettable shows that create the euphoria that I experienced at my first concert. I came away from that gig feeling completely elated, inspired and as if there was no reason that couldn't be me up there. 

Continuing to grow as a songwriter is also key. I believe if I do this, I'll gain everything I set out to achieve. 

What's on your current playlist?

I am currently listening to Tom Misch's new album "What Kinda Music". I think it's fantastic and a real showcase of an Artist that is able to do exactly what he wants without diluting his style. It's great to see people are reacting so well to it. 

I'm also listening to Maisie Peters , who I think is a really talented pop writer. I love her simplicity.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?

After my debut release I can't wait to share the singles I've been working on for 2020 release and also perform my songs live. There's always a nervous excitement to see how they'll be received, but a lot of hard work and love has gone into these songs and I'm proud of what I've created. Beyond that, watch this space I guess!

Famous last words?

Don't have any regrets, grab opportunities whilst you can, and HAVE FUN with it.



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Thursday, 18 June 2020

Meet award-winning singer-songwriter Jamie Lawson


Jamie Lawson has released his 5-track heartfelt EP, Moving Images on May 29th, via Lookout Mountain Records. The London based-musician finds Inspiration in  a variety of different artists, quoting the likes of  Jackson 5, The Smiths, REM, Ian Hamilton, Sylvia Plath, Andy Lawson, Allan Lawson as inspiration. However, Jamie Lawson has also found inspiration closer to home, sharing that the opening song of the EP - ‘A Perfect Year’ was inspired by his wife. It is a sentimental ballad with stunning string melodies and Jamie’s distinctive emotive delivery that was originally written in a panic as a present for his wife on their first anniversary after the present he had organised hadn’t arrived.

In the absence of tours, Jamie will be performing live-streamed concerts via his Instagram page. See his socials below for regular updates as to the performance timings.

Learn more about the rising star in the exclusive interview below.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
My earliest entries into music appreciation? I’m not sure what that means but I’m going to go with my earliest memories of music I liked.

The Smiths, The Housemartins and The Jackson 5. My elder brothers had their albums and I would listen to them all the time. I loved them then and I love them still. Great songs with brilliant lyrics and amazing melodies. Often really happy music under very sad or political lyrics. I didn’t really know about politics at the time, I was just a kid. I do remember walking around the playground at primary school singing, “Please, please, please let me, let me, let me get what I want this time: having no idea what it was about at all. That’s how music works when you’re young, you respond to melody over anything else.

As for production, it wasn’t something I found out about till much much later, that someone sat behind a mixing desk and sort of orchestrated how a record was made. When I’d moved to London in my 20’s all I did was argue with producers to turn my vocal down. I was so insecure. It took me a long time to trust someone.
I’ve started to produce myself these days. The new Moving Images EP was recorded in my home studio in Manchester. I’ve got a lot to learn still but I think I’m getting there.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
My writing process is generally playing as much as I can until some chord structure or pattern moves me in some way. I usually sing complete nonsense over the top and at some point, more often than not, a sentence appears that you haven’t thought about and makes you head in that direction. Then I start writing things down or making voice notes. If I think a track will help the mood a bit I’ll start building a track but sometimes that can get in the way so I’ll just stick to guitar and voice.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
Working as it gets creative juices going. It isn’t just going to be there any time you want it, you have to work at it, you have to keep the cogs well oiled and the only way to do that that I’ve found is to put the hours in.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
The main thing I’d change at the moment is the amount songwriters get paid via streaming services. The percentages are so incredibly low it’s criminal. I’m lucky to have had a hit that’s been streamed many millions of times but most bands and artists don't and these days, especially right now with no live music able to happen, streaming is the only way for artists to make money. It needs to be rebalanced. The money is there it just isn’t being distributed correctly or fairly.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
I think I’m becoming more of a studio person than I used to be. I used to always prefer a live audience, there’s nothing like it really but lately, I’m becoming more of a homebody. I’m really enjoying live stream gigs which I do every Monday at 7pm and that enables me to interact with my fanbase on a regular basis. It almost makes it a more personal experience because I do a live request show where you can join me on my stream. It’s nearly the best of both worlds but I’m sure I’ll start to miss actual touring again soon.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
The very personal ones are the ones that stick with me. The messages I get about how a song of mine has got someone through a difficult time in their life. That means the world to me.

What's on your current playlist?
I made this playlist yesterday, I titled it songs I haven’t heard in a while:

Wheat - These Are Things
Richard Thompson - I Feel So Good
Better Oblivion Community Centre - Dylan Thomas
Gemma Hayes - Undercover
Bjork - Joga
Leonard Cohen - First We Take Manhattan
The National - Think You Can Wait
The Finn Brothers - Won’t Give In
Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
Well I have a new EP coming out on 29th May called Moving Images that I’m very happy with. I’m releasing my debut album Last Night Stars on vinyl for the first time in August this year as part of Record Store Day and then hopefully another EP towards the end of the year.

Famous last words?
“Yes, I Was.”


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Exclusive interview with lead vocalist of Kid Violet


Take a gander at the old school rock n roll stylings of Kid Violet’s latest single, ‘Release’. The UK band takes inspiration from musicians as wide-ranging as Joy Division, Arctic Monkeys and The Strokes to Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and Interpol. The end result gives listeners a modern, relevant sound that still highlights the best aspects found within the genre.

Curious about the band who managed to strike this balance, we sat down for an exclusive interview with lead singer and co-songwriter, Billy. Turns out, he has a pretty unique sense of humour to boot.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
My first gig was Glasto 08 but I was in an 11-year-old emo phase so couldn't really appreciate the music at all. Saw Panic At The Disco over Kings of Leon, so yeah you could say it was pretty bad! Music production, I actually wanted to be a full-time choir boy at one point but I didn't pass the entrance exam - might have been a blessing in disguise, you know that one.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
Our songwriting process tends to start with an idea recorded and sent in a Facebook message. Then I'll normally sit on it for a while and come up with some questionable ideas whilst half-cut and listen back in the morning and have to sort it out. Then we put something together on Logic, everyone learns their parts, jump in a practice room, smash it out, bob's your uncle, fanny's your aunt.

What gets your creative juices flowing?
Breakups and alcohol

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
I think social media and streaming platforms mean that things have become much more image-based than they were before, but it also means you can access your fan base much more easily so I don't think I would change it. People don't seem to go to as many up and coming band's gigs as they use to since there is so much to do and see. Hopefully, Rona changes that though and people will be packed to the rafters (figuratively socially distanced).

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
Live audience definitely, although sound can be a big issue at a lot of venues, you can't beat the real thing.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
We played at a sold-out Nambucca in January and you couldn't get near enough to see us play. That was pretty cool to be fair. We get people to reach out to us a fair bit on twitter and that feels class, knowing that people you don't know really connect with your music is an amazing feeling.

What's on your current playlist?
Even though it's Bono's son so it's nepotism at it's finest, I think Inhaler are unreal and will be huge next year. I bought a synth and have been working hard on trying to bring a bit more of that into our tunes so there's been a lot of 80's music. Honourable mentions for The Murder Capital, Orielles, Shame and The Lilacs

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
We have three new tunes coming out in the next couple of months which we are really excited about. They're a bit more upbeat indie dance vibes than our last few so it's nice to mix things up. We're recording our EP with a fantastic producer Gavin Monaghan at the end of summer and hope to have that out late autumn time to coincide with a big fat tour and world domination.

Famous last words?
"Cheers guys, we'll see you at Isle of Wight" - Rough Trade Nottingham - 11th March 2020


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Thursday, 11 June 2020

Q&A with rising Indie-rock star Alexander Teller


We recently discovered Alexander Teller, who has just released his latest single, ‘I Got Free’. The single is the last to be shared before his upcoming album, Alexander Teller Is A Snake Oil Seller is released. The record reflects on some sobering and mournful narratives that are spun into compellingly artful indie-rock offerings, yet this particular single displays greater optimism.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?
It’s not my earliest memory of listening, but I do remember having a kind of epiphany after getting given a mixtape by an older friend called “It’s Not Easy Being 14”. It had Bloc Party’s Silent Alarm on there, and I remember thinking I’d never heard anything like Helicopter before. It was so brash and bold, both in the playing and production. Then you’ve got Kele Okereke’s vocals, shouting over the top in an unapologetically English accent. A lot of my most impactful records contain some aspect of “I didn’t know you were allowed to do that?!” in them. I’ll never know if its nostalgia of not, but I still consider that one of my favourite albums.

Funnily enough, years later I reconnected with that friend through playing the open mic in Camberwell. He’s now playing keys in my live band.

Take us through your songwriting process. Are there any particular steps you take when putting music together?
I’ve changed my process many times. I’ll probably have to find a new trick for the next album, but I’ve all but abandoned trying to start with musical ideas. I write down any “spicy thoughts” (hey that’s a good band name) I have on my notes. That’s either a song title or perhaps a phrase or poem that has something to it. It’s an exercise in making sure that there’s a purpose to making the song. After that, you just have to follow where that idea leads. It informs the musical choices and the way you sing it. After all, if it can’t save your life, then what’s the point?

What gets your creative juices flowing?
I find it more difficult to write the picturesque. Some people are great at that, and invite you into their beautiful worlds. I’m a bit of shit so I’m more often shining a light on my more disgusting or pathetic thoughts and desires. Honestly, I think everyone should investigate their Jungian “Shadow”. What your subconscious is doing will manifest itself in some way or other whether you like it or not. I’d rather get acquainted with my fears and anxieties, and do so in a way that is not morbid or mopey. I have fun with it.

That’s just one way of trying to find some spice. You can write about literally anything, if you’ve got the chops.

As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Well I’m not internationally famous, so I’m either no good at the business side, no good at the art side (or both). My ego assures me it’s an artist.

There should be some tension between business and art, otherwise one will inevitably rule the other. However, I remember Taylor Swift saying somewhere that if she wasn’t a songwriter she’d be a marketing exec or something. But then again, she’s got 100% more yachts than me.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, which do you prefer?
I think if you don’t like both of them then you’re in the wrong business.

What is the most memorable response you have had to your music?
Well I don’t know if this is the most memorable. But I remember some guy at the open mic once said “you really lost yourself in that one”. Let’s hope it was a good thing.

What's on your current playlist?
I’m currently seshing 69 Love Songs by The Magnetic Fields. Right up my street. I only found out about John Prine a couple of days before he died. It adds a kind of melancholy to my first experiences of hearing his tunes. For some reason, I’ve been also listening to a lot of old Scottish and Irish folk.

Breakdown the news for us: what can we expect from you in the near future?
I’m going to release an album. It’s going to be called “Alexander Teller Is A Snake Oil Seller”. Is the whole thing an exercise in narcissism? Perhaps.

Famous last words?
My irony isn’t nearly as clever as I think it is.


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